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(For tea party and Occupy Wall Street movements, some common ground - The Washington Postから)

Wayne Schissler walked the four blocks from his workplace to the  small Occupy Allentown protest to show the young demonstrators that a  tea party member is not a monster. What he learned after a few hours of  talk surprised him.
“They didn’t stink, and they weren’t on drugs,” he said. “I could see me being them, 30 years ago.”
Fifteen hundred miles away in rural Minnesota, Vas Littlecrow, a tea  party die-hard since the movement’s early days, let the Internet noise  about Occupy Wall Street wash over her, leaving her alternately annoyed  and intrigued. She went on Google Plus to debate the Occupiers, “and  they started saying things that clicked with me,” she said. “This was  deja vu with how I got into the tea party.”
At the Occupy D.C. encampment at McPherson Square,  Thom Reges, who plans to live in a tent till spring, spent the better  part of a morning  last week on a park bench debating America’s plight  with a tea party member.  They clashed over whether government should do more or less to put  people back to work but agreed that both political parties do little or  nothing for average Americans.
Although many organizers of the two  populist efforts view their counterparts from the other end of the  spectrum as misguided or even evil, attitudes among the rank and file of  the tea party and Occupy Wall Street are often much more accepting and flexible. They start out with  different views about the role of government, but in interviews and  online discussions they repeatedly share many of the same frustrations,  as well as a classically American passion for fixing the system.
No one expects the tea party and Occupy movements to merge forces, but their adherents are  discovering that their stories are often strikingly similar: They  searched for jobs and came up empty. They found work, but their pay  barely covered food and rent, with nothing left over even to buy an old  car. They saw their towns empty out as young people moved away in search  of money and meaning.

(For tea party and Occupy Wall Street movements, some common ground - The Washington Postから)

Wayne Schissler walked the four blocks from his workplace to the small Occupy Allentown protest to show the young demonstrators that a tea party member is not a monster. What he learned after a few hours of talk surprised him.

“They didn’t stink, and they weren’t on drugs,” he said. “I could see me being them, 30 years ago.”

Fifteen hundred miles away in rural Minnesota, Vas Littlecrow, a tea party die-hard since the movement’s early days, let the Internet noise about Occupy Wall Street wash over her, leaving her alternately annoyed and intrigued. She went on Google Plus to debate the Occupiers, “and they started saying things that clicked with me,” she said. “This was deja vu with how I got into the tea party.”

At the Occupy D.C. encampment at McPherson Square, Thom Reges, who plans to live in a tent till spring, spent the better part of a morning last week on a park bench debating America’s plight with a tea party member. They clashed over whether government should do more or less to put people back to work but agreed that both political parties do little or nothing for average Americans.

Although many organizers of the two populist efforts view their counterparts from the other end of the spectrum as misguided or even evil, attitudes among the rank and file of the tea party and Occupy Wall Street are often much more accepting and flexible. They start out with different views about the role of government, but in interviews and online discussions they repeatedly share many of the same frustrations, as well as a classically American passion for fixing the system.

No one expects the tea party and Occupy movements to merge forces, but their adherents are discovering that their stories are often strikingly similar: They searched for jobs and came up empty. They found work, but their pay barely covered food and rent, with nothing left over even to buy an old car. They saw their towns empty out as young people moved away in search of money and meaning.

Notes

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